Light Pollution!

This topic contains 4 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Kirk Singh 5 years, 10 months ago.

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  • #2747

    Kirk Singh
    Registered user
    0p

    Firstly id like to say hi to everyone as i am new to to LAS. I have always had an interest in astronomy, but until recently never had a telescope to further my interest. Since xmas i have viewed Jupiter and its 4 moons, the amazingly beautiful pleiades star cluster, aswell as a numer of stars and recently saturn, which was an amazing sight!
    The one thing that hinders me is light pollution. I live inbetween speke and garston, with the airport not too far away, and the light pollution is pretty bad. I have since discovered that i can buy a light pollution filter. Will this significantly reduce light pollution or would it be a waste of money?

    #3198

    Kirk Singh
    Registered user
    0p

    oops i meant jupiter and 4 of its moons!

    #3199

    David Galvin
    Administrator
    2p

    Hi Kirk, Light Pollution Filters work  by filtering out the troublesome wavelengths such as the orange low pressure sodium street lights or the bright pink/white high pressure sodium. This helps to enhance the fainter objects giving a better contrast but, to be honest, I think that you may be fighting a losing battle with the airport and surrounding industrial units. Why not come up to the observatory and have a chat, with other more experienced observers then myself, and perhaps if it is clear you could try out some of the filters that we use to see through our local light pollution.
    Of course if all else fails you could always become a lunar and solar observer. :-)

    #3200

    Dave Bentley
    Registered user
    0p

    Hi Kirk,
    Lots of us suffer from being in the city but there is always something to look at up there. Light polution filters do work but their effectiveness can vary from night to night. I have used them for years and they seem to work better when the sky is murky and you get that horrible orangy glow reflecting off dust or water particles in the air. They also seem to work better as the telescope apperture increases and basically come in two types narrow band & broad band. Narrow band filters are for specific wavelengths and can make a big difference to things like the Orion nebula or the Ring nebula but will cut starlight (including galaxies). If you only intend getting one filter then go for a broad band which should improve most things. Expect to pay between £30 – £80.
    Dave B   

    #3201

    Kirk Singh
    Registered user
    0p

    Thanks for your advice. I will certainly pop down to the observatory one weds evening. As i am a complete beginner when it comes to observing the sky, speaking to those more experienced than me will help me a great deal.
    With regards to the filter, i most certainly will take your advice, im just worried that as i only have a 3″ reflector it wont make much of a difference. But i will definately give it a go!

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