The Liverpool Astronomical Society

“SIC ITUR AD ASTRA” (Thus, the way to the stars)

The Society’s aims are the same as when it was formed in 1881:

To promote the science of Astronomy primarily in Liverpool and the neighbourhood thereof

Registered as a Charitable Educational Trust – No 519955.


For the past two years the restrictions of the global pandemic have meant that the Liverpool Astronomical Society has not been able to share our fascination for the night sky with our members and with the public.

It gives me great pleasure to advise that our observatory at Pex Hill, Cronton is now open again each Wednesday evening (commencing 27th April 2022).

Come along and get a closer look at the night sky with us. This is an opportunity to learn more about the fascinating science of astronomy, meet our members and share our knowledge. Opening times will be 7pm until 9pm or later and may vary. Check social media (Twitter / Facebook) and our website to keep up to date. Contact the Observatory Director here for specific information about Pex Hill.

Please note: Voluntary COVID precautions will still be in place including restrictions to the numbers inside the building.

Clear Skies

Steve Southern,

President
Liverpool Astronomical Society

Buying a Telescope?

Are you thinking of buying a telescope for yourself or a loved one this Christmas? Have a read of our handy guide to help make your choice.


James Webb Space Telescope

James Webb Space Telescope Pocket Guide (PDF) – Technical information, useful links and updates about the JWST. The PDF updates from time to time, so check from month-to-month for an update.

Mars Missions

What’s In The Night Sky?

The apps below allow you to set both your current location and the time of day/night, so you can see not only what is visible right now from where you are, but also for other times and places.

  • Stellarium
    • Web browser (free, simple but effective, no installation required)
    • Desktop version (free, requires installation but has more advanced features. Available for Linux, MacOS X, Windows)
    • Mobile version
      • Android (free, with in-app purchases to unlock advanced features such as telescope control)
      • iOS (£9.99)
  • SkySafari
    • Desktop version (prices range from Free, with in-app purchases, to £54.99 depending on version. MacOS X only.)
      Note: The SkySafari website says $9.99 for the entry-level version, but on visiting the Apple App Store it is actually Free
    • Mobile version
      • Android (prices range from free, with in-app purchases, to £34.99 depending on version)
        Note: The SkySafari website says $2.99 for the entry-level version, but on visiting the Google App Store it is actually Free
      • iOS (prices range from £2.99, with in-app purchases, to £38.99, depending on version)

Our Social Media

Other useful links

You can find more astronomy and science related sites on our Links page here.


Gerard Gilliga and Allan Chapman - 24th February 2017
At our February 2017 lecture we welcomed an old friend in Professor Allan Chapman, who gave us his talk on “The Ferret of Comets; Charles Messier and astronomy in 18th century France.”
As usual Allan delivered an entertaining, informative and inspiring talk. The audience of approximately 90 people showed their appreciation with an extended applause afterwards.
“As always, it was a great pleasure to come up to the LAS and to speak. I was delighted to get such a large and appreciative audience”; Allan Chapman