Category Archives: Deep Sky

Articles and information regarding deep-sky objects

Monthly Meeting: Professor Derek Ward-Thompson – “How to Take a Picture of a Black Hole”

The March 2020 monthly meeting of Liverpool Astronomical Society for the 2019 – 2020 (138th) session will be held on Friday, March 20th from 19:00 to 21:00. Our guest speaker this month is Professor Derek Ward-Thompson, Head of the School of Physical Sciences and Computing at the University of Central Lancashire, Director of the Jermiah […] Continue Reading »

Remote Imaging Workshop, Saturday 9th June, 2018

As part of the informal activities initiative, a free Remote Imaging Workshop will take place with Pete Williamson FRAS. The workshop is for LAS members and members of the North West Group of Astronomical Societies (NWGAS). Pete is a Deep Sky Imaging consultant with the Faulkes Telescope Educational Project which has 2 metre, 1 metre […] Continue Reading »

Monthly Meeting: Friday, 17th November, 2017

The November 2017 monthly meeting of Liverpool Astronomical Society for the 2017 – 2018 (136th) session will be held on Friday, November 17th from 19:00 to 21:30. Our guest speaker this month is Dr. Julian Onions of the University of Nottingham, whose lecture about metallicity in stars is entitled: “Metal Detecting” What are metals to […] Continue Reading »

Monthly Meeting: Friday, 16th November, 2018

The November 2018 monthly meeting of Liverpool Astronomical Society for the 2018 – 2019 (137th) session will be held on Friday, November 16th from 19:00 to 21:00. Our guest speaker this month is Mr. Peter Williamson FRAS, whose lecture is entitled: “Remote Telescopes for Education & Public Access” Mr. Williamson will talk to members about […] Continue Reading »

Monthly Meeting: Friday, 18th January, 2019

The January 2019 monthly meeting of Liverpool Astronomical Society for the 2018 – 2019 (137th) session will be held on Friday, January 18th from 19:00 to 21:00. Our guest speaker this month is Dr. Steve Barrett, Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Physics at the University of Liverpool, whose lecture is entitled: “Legacy of the Hubble […] Continue Reading »

Monthly Meeting: Friday 20th January, 2017

The January 2017 monthly meeting of Liverpool Astronomical Society for session 2016-17, will take place on Friday, January 20th 2017 from 7pm. Our guest speaker this month is Melanie Davies FRAS, the founder of Creative Space, Hastings, whose lecture is entitled: “The Pleiades” – covering the mythology to modern-day science Subscriptions for 2016-2017 are now overdue […] Continue Reading »

Monthly Meeting: Friday 24th February, 2017

The February 2017 monthly meeting of Liverpool Astronomical Society for session 2016-17, will take place on Friday, February 24th 2017 from 7pm. Please note that this is the 4th Friday of the month, not the 3rd Friday. Our guest speaker this month is Dr. Allan Chapman FRAS, whose lecture is entitled: “The ‘Ferret of Comets’; Charles […] Continue Reading »

Merseyside Astronomy Day 2014

Continuing the MADness from the 2013 Merseyside Astronomy Day, Liverpool John Moores University’s Astrophysics Research Institute are pleased to announce that MAD IX will be held on Saturday 26th April 2014. The event will include a series of talks from a range of professional astrophysicists, with some additions this year in our new venue including […] Continue Reading »

Talk: Galactic Archaeology (The 2015 John Porter Memorial Lecture)

The history of computer simulations of galaxies like our own Milky Way is dotted with remarkable successes, but an even greater number of impressive failures. This inability to make a model of the Milky Way is quite surprising, given that the basic physics is well understood, and part of the A-level syllabus here in the […] Continue Reading »

Supernova SN 2014J in M82

Society members, including our own LAS Supernova Search team, have been imaging the recent supernova (now designated SN 2014J) in M82 / NGC 3034 (also known as the Cigar Galaxy). At a distance of approximately 11½ Light Years (roughly 68,000,000,000,000 miles!), it is the closest supernova to us since 1993 (SN 1993J). Although it now […] Continue Reading »