Category Archives: Open Clusters

Monthly Meeting: Friday 20th January, 2017

The January 2017 monthly meeting of Liverpool Astronomical Society for session 2016-17, will take place on Friday, January 20th 2017 from 7pm. Our guest speaker this month is Melanie Davies FRAS, the founder of Creative Space, Hastings, whose lecture is entitled: “The Pleiades” – covering the mythology to modern-day science Subscriptions for 2016-2017 are now overdue […] Continue Reading »

Constellation of the Month (December 2008) – Taurus, by Steve Southern

Avoiding the obvious Orion, December’s constellation of the month is the wonderful Taurus, the bull. Click for printable map http://www.hawastsoc.org/deepsky/tau/tau.htm Myth Taurus is one of the oldest zodiacal constellations. According to myth, Taurus represents the bull form taken on by Jupiter or Zeus in pursuit of the fair maidens of the seven sisters (Pleiades). There […] Continue Reading »

Deep Sky – December 2008 by Dave Owen

The constellation of Auriga culminates, reaches its highest point in our sky, at about midnight in mid December. However, even at about 21:00, in mid December, it is about 60 degrees above the horizon and conditions should be excellent for finding the 3 bright star clusters included in Charles Messier’s 18th century list of comet […] Continue Reading »

Multi-wavelength Observing – November 2008, by Brian Finney

Following on from his article last month Brian Finney brings the latest news on Multi-wavelength observations with a portrait of a star-forming cloud, called NGC 346 which is the brightest star-forming region in the Small Magellanic Cloud. The colour code is red for infra red wavelengths showing cold dust; green for visible wavelengths and blue […] Continue Reading »

Deep Sky – November 2008 by Dave Owen

The constellation of Perseus is about 60 degrees high, and still rising, at about 21:00 GMT in mid November. This can mean  that  some  objects  in  this  constellation,  especially  with  Dobsonian  telescopes,  can  be difficult  to  see near  its passage through our zenith. Therefore, they can sometimes be seen more easily when they are still […] Continue Reading »

Deep Sky – October 2008 by Dave Owen

The constellation of Cassiopeia rises to considerable altitudes during the course of October evenings. There are a very large number of star clusters in this constellation that are easily visible in quite small telescopes. Although Charles Messier, in the 1780’s only noted two in his catalogue of around 100 nebulous objects; M52 and M103. William […] Continue Reading »

Members Observations (Up to December 1997)

Drawings by John Knott Lunar Observations by John Knott, August 1992 – December 1996 Mars Observations by John Knott, March – April 1997 Astrophotography by Gerard Gilligan Astrophotography by David Forshaw David Forshaw’s Astronomy Homepage Noctilucent Clouds photographed by David Galvin Drawings by Geoff Regan Jupiter Mars Saturn Comet Hyakutake More drawings by Geoff Regan […] Continue Reading »

Deep Sky Observations by Tony Williams from COAA

Some images taken on Ektachrome film by Tony Williams on a COAA (Centro de Observação Astronómica no Algarve) trip in October 1998. Images include galaxies, nebulae and open clusters. Continue Reading »