Category Archives: Old Newsletters

Multi-wavelength Observing – November 2008, by Brian Finney

Following on from his article last month Brian Finney brings the latest news on Multi-wavelength observations with a portrait of a star-forming cloud, called NGC 346 which is the brightest star-forming region in the Small Magellanic Cloud. The colour code is red for infra red wavelengths showing cold dust; green for visible wavelengths and blue […] Continue Reading »

Deep Sky – November 2008 by Dave Owen

The constellation of Perseus is about 60 degrees high, and still rising, at about 21:00 GMT in mid November. This can mean  that  some  objects  in  this  constellation,  especially  with  Dobsonian  telescopes,  can  be difficult  to  see near  its passage through our zenith. Therefore, they can sometimes be seen more easily when they are still […] Continue Reading »

Adventures in Arizona, Rob Johnson

It could be said that Arizona is the world ‘capital’ of astronomy, with clear skies for much of the year and home to several major observatories it is an irresistible holiday destination. So my family and I visited this summer and combined holiday with astronomy to tour around some of the many places of astronomical […] Continue Reading »

Multi-wavelength Observing – The Future, by Brian Finney

Our electromagnetic wavelength detectors – eyes to you and me – are only sensitised to light in the visible part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Whilst I have a great respect for nature and its ability to even develop the eye, a magnificent piece of equipment, it has extreme limitations for the purposes of astronomy. The […] Continue Reading »

Deep Sky – October 2008 by Dave Owen

The constellation of Cassiopeia rises to considerable altitudes during the course of October evenings. There are a very large number of star clusters in this constellation that are easily visible in quite small telescopes. Although Charles Messier, in the 1780’s only noted two in his catalogue of around 100 nebulous objects; M52 and M103. William […] Continue Reading »

Deep Sky – September 2008 by Dave Owen

The constellation of Capricorn, dim and indistinct  in light polluted skies, due to its low altitude, reaches its highest elevation above our horizon in mid September at about 22:30 BST. It is worth hunting for its only Messier object, the small globular star cluster M30, (RA 21:40, Dec -23:11 epoch 2000). It is only about […] Continue Reading »

Deep Sky August 2008 – Dave Owen

The constellation of Delphinus, the Dolphin, reaches its highest point in our skies, due south, at about midnight in the middle of August. Although the individual stars are fairly faint, it is easier to see than the fainter constellation of Vulpecula that lies on its northern border. Although it contains no Messier Objects, it does […] Continue Reading »

Surprise at the Science Museum, Chris Banks

During a recent trip to London, I paid a visit to the Science Museum. In the space gallery were the old favourites of the mock-up Lunar Module and various rockets and space vehicles. The one item that really caught my eye however, was the first mirror that Willaim Herschel made for his great 40-foot telescope […] Continue Reading »